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Plant Protection for Michigan Nurseries

Certification and education prevents viruses from threatening the nursery industry

The most destructive viral disease of stone fruit was detected in southwestern Michigan during routine testing by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) in the summer of 2006. Thankfully, this was the state’s only encounter with Plum Pox Virus, but the scare quickly affected commerce and halted trade.

“We did a massive amount of surveying to ensure that we eradicated the virus. We still continue to monitor for this,” says Elizabeth Dorman, laboratory scientist for MDARD’s Pesticide and Plant Pest Management (PPPM) Division, which is responsible for responding to the detection of harmful insects and diseases, as well as certifying plants, fruits and vegetables.

Through the plant pathology lab at the MDARD Geagley Laboratory…

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A Recipe for Success in Tennessee

Food entrepreneurs and startups are on the rise in Tennessee

Original, tasty and made in Tennessee – food businesses have found a niche for their products at local farmers markets and other outlets throughout the state. Whether pursuing a family recipe or following a food trend, the state offers resources for food startups taking their product or service to market.

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Global Hunger Solutions in Tennessee

Tennessee leads in preparing to feed growing world population

Feeding 9 billion people by 2050 – undoubtedly one of the most daunting challenges facing the world today. But in Tennessee, the mindset is optimistic with a plan to turn these challenges into opportunities. By focusing on the intersection of food, health and prosperity, and encouraging more partnerships and collaboration with the private sector, the state is a leader in fighting global hunger and preparing for the demands of a growing population…

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Montana: The Meat of It

Multi-generational ranchers set the state’s beef industry apart

It all started in 1864 with Henry Sieben, a German immigrant who came to Montana at age 17. Over the course of a few decades, he started buying oxen and running free- range cattle. Today, his legacy lives on at Sieben Ranch as the fourth and fifth generations contribute to Montana’s high-quality beef industry…

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Alabama’s Uncommon Fodder

Southeastern Hay Contest recognizes farmers’ successes, based on forage quality

Blessed with an abundant quantity of hay and forage, Alabama’s farmers are now on a mission for quality – a revolution that’s changing the industry – with competitions and soil tests increasing, growers are discovering just what’s in their hay.

At this year’s Southeastern Hay Contest during the Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moultrie, Ga., hay samples were submitted from the 13 Southeastern states. A grand total of 185 entries were vying for the top prize in six categories. The Relative Forage Quality (RFQ), which ranks forages according to nutritional quality, was used to determine the victors. Alabama’s own Leavelle Farms in Buhl, Ala. was among the winners…

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Specialty Treats in Alabama

Research aids farmers seeking to diversify into niche crops

For the farmer, diversity is always a good thing, and specialty crops can be a profitable option. Grown on small plots of land, these high-value crops are attracting attention in Alabama. Cutting-edge research from Auburn University and an Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station is making specialty crops easier to grow than ever before.

Already on the market, satsumas, kiwifruit and shiitake mushrooms are proving to be viable specialty crops for state farmers, and highly desirable by health-conscious consumers. Meanwhile, research on Asian pears, jujube, pawpaws, pomegranates and bananas are demonstrating strong potential with the possibility to be commercially grown in the future…

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Best Ski Slopes for Kids Near Baltimore

Best Ski Slopes for Kids Near Baltimore

According to a recent New York Times article, 83 percent of first-time skiers and snowboarders don’t return for a second visit and give up. Help improve your child’s beginner experiences by choosing the right mountains in the area to get started and gain confidence. This list also includes mountains that offer more variety of beginner and intermediate trails as well as terrain parks that will continue to challenge and excite kids with every visit.

If skiing and snowboarding isn’t of interest, many of these resorts offer a host of family-fun activities ranging from snow tubing to snow shoeing and much more. Just remember, since all snow-related activities are dependent on the weather, be sure to check the website or call the resort hotline in advance to check on mountain conditions before leaving home. This will ensure there’s “snow much fun” for kids, and their families too.

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Baltimore’s March for the Animals Kick-Off Party 2015 to Shake Off Winter Blues

Baltimore’s March for the Animals Kick-Off Party 2015 to Shake Off Winter Blues

Are you an animal lover without plans this Friday? Or have the arctic temperatures been keeping you and your dog inside for too long now? It’s time to shake off those winter blues, make new friends, and enjoy pizza, beer, wine, snacks, and of course, ample play time too.

On Friday, February 13th the Maryland SPCA is hosting its March for the Animals Kick-Off Party 2015 at the Downtown Dog Resort & Spa from 5:30-7:30 p.m. and there is no shortage of fun doggie activities in store for four-legged guests and plenty of entertainment for pet owners too.

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Passionate about Poultry in Arkansas

Ranking as Arkansas’s eighth agricultural commodity and third in total U.S. production, turkeys are more than just a Thanksgiving Day affair. With the number of health-conscious consumers on the rise, Arkansas’s turkey industry is prepared to meet increasing demands, and here’s why.

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Taking the Initiative: AgriNovus Indiana

In a dynamic global marketplace driven by change, Indiana’s food and agricultural industry is no stranger to innovation. In fact, it is a hub for cutting-edge research and development. Recognizing the complex challenges facing the U.S. and abroad from food scarcity to security, Indiana’s businesses, industry associations, universities and government work tirelessly to improve efficiency, productivity and quality at every level.

Yet despite the state’s notable strengths in agricultural innovation over the years, there remained a lack of strategic collaboration among these entities – until now. In 2013, a new set of chapters unfolded, coupling the robust, future tech-oriented story with farming legacy.

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